Grants

National Grants Funding Dissertation Research

  • 2016-2017: National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellowship, $27,500
  • 2016-2017: P.E.O. (a philanthropic education organization) Scholar Award, $15,000.

Dissertation abstract: This dissertation aims to develop a framework for how societal beliefs about challenge in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) influence students’ subsequent decisions to major, complete degrees, and intent to pursue careers in those domains.  Recent evidence suggests beliefs that mathematics-intensive subjects like physics, engineering, mathematics, and computer sciences (PEMC) (Nix, Perez-Felkner, & Thomas, 2015; Perez-Felkner, McDonald, Schneider, & Grogan, 2012) are extremely difficult and are appropriate only for those possessing innate gifts (Dweck, 2008; Leslie, Cimpian, Meyer, & Freeland, 2015).  Research additionally points to differences in ability beliefs by race/ethnicity and gender (OECD, 2015).  However, how these identities affect perceptions of field-specific exclusivity and STEM major/career choice is not yet fully understood.  Using nationally representative Education Longitudinal Study: 2002/12 data as well as a qualitative analysis of original interview data, this dissertation will (1) distinguish between students’ general belief in their STEM competence and their perceived ability under challenge in mathematics-intensive fields, (2) demonstrate the specific association between perceived ability under challenge in mathematics-intensive fields and major and career outcomes, (3) identify how students make meaning of their experiences with challenge in mathematics-intensive fields, and (4) describe how the postsecondary experience shapes perceived ability under challenge.  Findings will help inform researchers, practitioners, and policymakers of the existence, impact, and developmental process of perceived ability under challenge.

Grants That Supported Research Efforts or Assistantships

  • Hu, S., Park, T., Tandberg, D. A., Bertand Jones, T. (2014-2017) “Florida Developmental Education Redesign.” The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, $1,119,266.

Explanation: The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation grant in part funds my research assistantship with the Center for Postseondary Success (CPS). Through my work with CPS, I assist with administrative and research tasks such as assisting with institutional review board applications, promoting our research findings, and coordinating guest speakers and events. I also assisted with the distribution and analysis of the third administrator survey. I helped to write the Hu et al., 2016 report.

  • Schneider, B., & Perez-Felkner, L. C. (2012-2015). “NSF GSE/RES: Enhancing the Rigor of Evidence on Gendered Differences in STEM Persistence: Female and Male College Students’ Subjective Experiences in Engineering and Computer Science.” National Science Foundation, $523,333.

Explanation: This grant helped to fund co-authors and build research capacity on the following publications about participation in specific STEM fields, ability beliefs, and institutional characteristics: Nix, S. & Perez-Felkner, 2017; Perez-Felkner, Nix, & Thomas, 2017; Nix, Perez-Felkner, & Thomas, 2015; Perez-Felkner, Thomas, Nix, & Hopkins, 2015.

  • Cox, B. E. C. (2011-2014). “Linking Institutional Policy To Student Success: A Pilot Study.” TG – Texas Guaranteed Student Loan Corporation, $153,323.

Explanation: This grant funded the Linking Institutional Policy To Student Success: A Pilot Study where I served as a research intern and co-authored the Cox et al., 2012 report.

Graduate Research Assistant on Grant Proposals

I acted as a graduate research assistant to develop and write sections of the following grant applications. Through this work, I gained invaluable experience in the diversity of grants available, how to determine the requirements of each grant, writing letters of intent, communication with program officers, and understanding feedback.

  • Hughes, R., Perez-Felkner, L., Tani, N. (submitted) “IUSE Exploratory Project: A Comparative Case Study of Undergraduate Chemistry and Physics Programs at Two Diverse College Campuses.” Improving Undergraduate STEM Education: Education and Human Resources, National Science Foundation, $299,999.
  • Bertrand Jones, T., Cox, B. E. C., Jordan-Jackson, F., Perez-Felkner, L., Witte, S. (2015) “Signals of Faculty Approachability: Facilitating Mentoring for Underrepresented Students in STEM.” Improving Undergraduate STEM Education: Education and Human Resources, National Science Foundation, $249,816. (Not Awarded)
  • Bertrand Jones, T., Cox, B. E. C., Perez-Felkner, L., Jordan-Jackson, F. (2014) “Signals of Faculty Approachability: Facilitating Mentoring for Underrepresented Students in STEM.” Council on Research & Creativity Multidisciplinary Grant, Florida State University, $24,996.83. (Not Awarded)
  • Bertrand Jones, T., Perez-Felkner, L., Jordan-Jackson, F. (2014) “Signals of Faculty Approachability: Facilitating Mentoring for Underrepresented Students in STEM.” Council on Research & Creativity Planning Grant, Florida State University, $13,000. (Not Awarded)
  • Cox, B. E. C., Bertrand Jones, T., Perez-Felkner, L., Jordan-Jackson, F. F., Witte, S. (2014). “Signals of Faculty Approachability: Facilitating Mentoring for Underrepresented Students in STEM Gateway Courses (Signals).” Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, $124,962. (Not Awarded)
  • Perez-Felkner, L. C., Bertrand Jones, T., Cox, B. E. C., Turner, J., Bernadin, S. L., Caldwell, C. V. (2013) “Multiple Perspectives, Multiple Settings: An Interdisciplinary Study of Underrepresented Minorities’ Persistence in STEM Fields,” Council on Research & Creativity Multidisciplinary Grant, Florida State University, $25,000. (Not Awarded)